Date with Grace: Reverse facestalking

12 09 2010

I wonder if Grace knows about this?

Sydney facebookers can try to woo blondeshell Grace Carter by petitioning the event page. If she likes your “vibe” and your offer on the RSVP, she’ll go out with you. Could be more authentic than Kate’s Party.

I stumbled across this through a sponsored ad, so I don’t know if this venture is actually cheaper than more conventional internet hook up websites (unless it was free trial advertising).

Would be suitors, might be wise to check Grace Carter’s personal profile, she has a tattoo (not that there’s anything wrong with that*), has a gambling problem (likes “Winning at Life”), and perhaps has a thing for 2 girls: 1 cup^ (likes “Heaps of Shit” & “Authentic Shit”). If that appeals and you’re African (likes “Kenya” and “Oxfam”) who likes taking your gurl “to da movies” and random yet public internet hookups, go for it tiger!

*plus, at least it’s not a tramp stamp

^if you don’t know, you don’t want to know

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Teenage attention span too short for Facebook

5 07 2010

An online gaming site has done a survey which reports that the main reason for teens leaving Facebook and other social networking sites is that it is not interesting enough for them. Obviously they need more ways to poke, bite, stab, tag, chat, and farm their friends.

While “It’s boring” ranked first amongst ‘lapsed facebook users’ (45%), not far behind was unsurprisingly “too many notifications” (27%), too hard to keep up with activity (21%), and too many ads (20%). Also coming up was the presence of parents and *shudder* other adults on Facebook. They do realise that it is meant for older people, right? (But not parents though, that is weird).

The gaming site obviously asked about social network gaming, and the economics related to it. I’m pretty happy that about two thirds of kids realise spending cash on virtual currency, clothes and power ups is a waste of money – but perhaps disheartened at the number of parents who have given children a special allowance to waste on virtual pitchforks and carrot seed. These parents should be really encouraging children to be online for at least tangible, if no less frivolous objects, such as crap on eBay, retail games (such as Steam or an MMORPG), or digital downlaodable content off iTunes. That would be the responsible thing, for sure.





Kate’s Having a Party

28 04 2010

Not quite a hump-day happy, but close enough.

I don’t know if it is the original event, but Kate’s party appears to be still on – are you going?





My moustache brings all the girls from the yard

18 11 2009

The children at work have gotten over their initial amusement at the sudden burst of facial hair after my return from over a month of absence.

I have gotten two Facebook messages of approval amongst a tirade of uproar – the most vocal being my sister (“for the love of all that is good – go and shave!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!”) – but the worst comment was probably this video.

So I’ve tried a pulled out my natural charm for this weeks photo.

Mandatory shill: Contribute your donation to men’s health here.





More like “lamebook”

16 11 2009

Indulge in one more Facebook-related post, I have to share Lamebook – warning, don’t click if don’t want to waste a few hours – possibly the best real-life example of why you need to be careful about what you post on a public online forum.

Keepers:





Yo! Farmville is a scam

16 11 2009

While none of the students I personally taught mentioned Facebook in my presence (except when I asked “What do you read? Books? Magazines?”), I did get accosted by some random kids on the playground who kept insisting that I needed to add them to Facebook and help them farm on Farmville.

Luckily, despite them constantly checking my mandatory name badge for my full name, none of them had the attention span or retention to actually add me, so I do not have to deal with that can of worms. I am still left with sister insisting last week that I join her farm, clan, sorority and/or kitchen.

So I find it this video a bit funny showing the CEO of Zynga (the company behind  Farmville, Mafia, Vampires, YoVille and all that other crap), admitting that he basically took every low channel possible to build up his capital in the early days. This came to light is just after TechCrunch complimented Zynga on its devotion to “clean up facebook”. It’s not quite as noble if you helped create the mess in the first place.

Disclaimer: While I have ditched my vampire/zombie applications, and will not be joining any of Zynga’s other projects, I am pretty hooked on it’s Texas Hold ‘Em app … join and send me chips





I am not your friend

13 11 2009

One of the best farewells that was written on my end-of-prac card was “you r now mi friend”. I had told this student earlier that day when he was not cooperating that today was the last day he had to make me his friend.

But is it okay to be friends with students? Particularly where everyone’s friends are now, Facebook.

During my last week, Education Queensland updated their code of conduct for employees to clearly stipulate that teachers “must not use internet social networks such as Face Book, My Space or YouTube to contact or access present students enrolled in any school or institute” and “If you use internet social networks in your personal time you must ensure that the content is appropriate and private, and that you restrict access to specific people who are not students” (Section 2.2.2 (b) Interactions with Students).

Teachers (along with probably everybody else) have been needing to be increasingly careful about what sort of material they make available online (for example). Thankfully a lot of social media websites have been updating features to make it easier to control how you are viewed online. At the start of previous school year Facebook blogged specifically to teachers about the benefits of making friends lists to control what is viewable by “students” (or non-teachers may like to create a similar group for “Uncles, Aunts and Grandparents”).

The private education sector in Queensland has yet to install a blanket ban on social media interactions with students (and last I heard they were not intending to go that far, but were considering available options). While I understand where EQ is coming from on this, it is a bit disappointing that there appears no room for leeway or principal-appointed exemptions (which are included on clauses regarding camera usage and other points). This means a whole range of Web 2.0 based activities and learning environments (Second Life, class blogging) are excluded from Queensland state school classrooms at all age levels (and I think it may also apply to TAFE classes too).

The Queensland Curriculum embraces technology on most levels, to me it just seems disappointing that it is not being flexible on this one. Perhaps their strategy is to ban it while they work out a more appropriate strategy to monitor student-teacher interactions on the world-wide-web.